Why do I want different guitars for different tunings?



Asked by: Joshua Coelho

For stage performers, it’s not uncommon for a guitarist to have two or three guitars at hand with different tunings, not only for “tonal” or “mechanical” reasons, but also so they can work through a set smoothly when different pieces require guitars with different tunings.

Do you need different guitars for different songs?





1. To Change Tunings. One of the most frequent reasons why guitarists change guitars between songs, is because they need it in a different tuning. The standard tuning of a guitar is E-A-D-G-B-E.

Why do people use different tunings?

Alternate tunings can also change how chords sound, often making them sound fuller and more open. Some players use open tunings to get a heavier guitar sound, while others might use them to help with techniques such as slide guitar or finger picking.

Is it bad for your guitar to change tunings?

While alternate tunings can shorten the life of your guitar strings, changing tunings is unlikely to damage your guitar. Most alternate tunings are actually lower in overall tension than standard tuning, so there’s no real risk of applying more tension than the guitar can handle.

Should beginners use alternate tunings?

Here’s the deal: Not all songs are written to be played in standard E-A-D-G-B-E tuning, so if you want to expand your range as a guitarist, you need to learn play some alternate guitar tunings. Alternate guitar tunings, or open tunings, allow you to play new songs and explore new music styles.

What 3 guitars should you own?





Three Guitars Every Guitar Player Should Own

  • The Fender Stratocaster. First up and probably most essential is the Fender Stratocaster. …
  • The Gibson Les Paul. Sometimes you need a little more guts out of your guitar. …
  • A Decent Acoustic Guitar.


Should I have different guitars for different tunings?

For stage performers, it’s not uncommon for a guitarist to have two or three guitars at hand with different tunings, not only for “tonal” or “mechanical” reasons, but also so they can work through a set smoothly when different pieces require guitars with different tunings.

What tunings did Nick Drake use?

E-A-D-G-B-E – Nick Drake uses the standard guitar tuning, E-A-D-G-B-E (from low to high), for: “Time Has Told Me”

What is the saddest guitar tuning?

Unofficially dubbed “the saddest tuning of all,” open D minor tuning is one of the easiest tunings to learn and also one of the most expressive. It allows you to play a D minor chord when you strum all six of your guitar strings in the open position.



What tuning is Dadgad?

D A D G A D, or Celtic tuning is an alternative guitar tuning most associated with Celtic music, though it has also found use in rock, folk, metal and several other genres. Instead of the standard tuning (E2 A2 D3 G3 B3 E4 ) the six guitar strings are tuned, from low to high, D2 A2 D3 G3 A3 D4 .

What tuning is Kashmir in?


Don't know how anyone could come up with it it's amazing we're gonna break it all down also thanks for supporting me with marty music I also have a patreon with a bunch of cool bonuses check out the

What tuning is Cgcfad?

Drop C tuning



CGCFAD is the standard Drop C tuning only with all the strings tuned down an additional step. It s best to use heavy-gauge strings when tuning this low. CGCFAD or Drop C is an excellent tuning for those who wish to play low heavy-metal or grunge riffs.

Is open D the same as DADGAD?

DADGAD is a bit more “ambiguous” than open D, that is, since the third is raised up to a fourth, the tuning is neither major or minor (Dsus4)…and hence, DADGAD is often called “D modal.” these chords are neither major or minor…and you can drone Ds either in the bass or treble.

Who first used drop D tuning?

Early hard rock songs tuned in drop D include The Beatles‘ “I Want You (She’s So Heavy)” and Led Zeppelin’s “Moby Dick”, both first released in 1969. Tuning the lowest string one tone down, from E to D, allowed these musicians to acquire a heavier and darker sound than in standard tuning.

Why is it called open G tuning?

Open G tuning gets its name from the open G chord because it requires guitarists to tune their strings to the notes that make up a G chord: G, B, and D. In open G tuning, you can play a G chord without having to use your fretting hand. Strike your strings in an open position and you have a G chord!