Naming notes in non 12-TET tunings?



Asked by: Nicholas Smithlin

Why do we use 12 tone equal temperament?





These are the frequency ratios we used to define what intervals are supposed to sound like for instance where you hear two notes an octave apart. The higher one is hitting your ear.

What is the best equal temperament?

Additionally, it also makes the semitone exactly half a whole tone, the simplest possible relationship. These are some of the reasons why 12-EDO has become the most commonly used equal temperament.

How far off is equal temperament?

Twelve-tone equal temperament is the musical system that divides the octave into 12 parts, all of which are equally tempered (equally spaced) on a logarithmic scale, with a ratio equal to the 12th root of 2 ( 12√2 ≈ 1.05946).

Why do we use 7 note scales?

The tradition from which western music derives began with filling in the most obvious stopping places in one octave. And if you go by that process it’s easy to end up with seven, but no more. The next pitch is called the octave because it’s the eighth note (just as an octopus has eight legs).

What temperament did Bach use?





UNEQUAL TEMPERAMENT



Bach didn’t use equal temperament. Neither did Mozart nor Beethoven or any of their contemporaries. They used unequal temperaments — also known as, you guessed it, Well-tempered. In the Well-Tempered Clavier, Bach celebrated unequal tempered tuning, not today’s equal tempered tuning.

Why does Western music have 12 notes?

The idea behind twelve is to build up a collection of notes using just one ratio. The advantage to doing so is that it allows a uniformity that makes modulating between keys possible.

What are the 7 musical notes names?

In traditional Indian music, musical notes are called svaras and commonly represented using the seven notes, Sa, Re, Ga, Ma, Pa, Dha and Ni. The eighth note, or octave, is given the same name as the first, but has double its frequency.

What are the 8 octaves?

You count the letters in between like a 2a a-b-c-d-e-f-g a that's 8 notes and the word octaves comes from the Latin word for 8. You might notice that these notes sound very similar in a way.

Why do musical notes end at G?

It's just a vibration of air at a fixed frequency measured in hertz.



Is middle C C3 or C4?

C4

We will follow the International Standards Organization (ISO) system for register designations. In that system, middle C (the first ledger line above the bass staff or the first ledger line below the treble staff) is C4. An octave higher than middle C is C5, and an octave lower than middle C is C3.

Why are notes named the way they are?

Notation clearly begun and developed in parallel with music theory, because you cannot record what notes are being used if you have no names for the notes, or way of identifying what relationships are between the notes. Hence, as the concepts of scales and keys began to take shape, so notes started to be named.



Why is there no E Sharp?

Where is E or B Sharp? There is no definitive reason why our current music notation system is designed as it is today with no B or E sharp, but one likely reason is due to the way western music notation evolved with only 7 different notes in a scale even though there are 12 total semitones.

Is an E# an F?

So why would one write it as an E#?



For this reason, the “F” note is known as E#. The same is true in F# Major and F# Harmonic Minor, which both have a major 7th scale degree, known as E#. You can read more about it here.

Why are there only 5 black keys?

And in the mid 15th century we decided that if you could lower a note with a flat, you could also raise a note with a sharp, so we invented that. The piano wasn’t created until another 300 years later, so it’s always had the five black key arrangement.